Just remember 3-1-6

For as long as I have been a born-again follower of Christ, I can remember witnessing. My pastor took me out witnessing regularly. Usually, I was a wreck. At first, I would fumble the presentation and only get the message out clearly on occasion, but my delivery improved over time and with proper instruction.

Once I had been studying a particular gospel presentation that my pastor had given me in order to help me learn the necessary steps and to give me a method of sharing the entire gospel with another person. I was standing on a front porch, hands sweating from nerves and mouth so dry that I could barely even get out the word, “Hello.” I found myself talking about everything except Jesus. Finally the lady to whom I was presenting the gospel said, “Spit it out; share something!” And with her encouragement, I managed to share the gospel with her and, with the assistance of my pastor, I had the joy of leading her to saving faith in Jesus Christ. 

I will never forget the exhilaration of that first soul-winning moment. I watched as the light of God filled her heart and the light of life came appeared in her eyes. That day, my pastor’s prayers and investment resulted in my heart being transformed into the heart of an evangelist. I couldn’t wait to share the gospel with others again and again. And I learned a valuable lesson that day. Don’t wait; share something.

There is always another soul in need of hearing this message. And the message is not especially difficult. But it must include the sinless life, death, burial, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus, the Son of God. And once you have established that each of us is a sinner separated from God and that Jesus paid the penalty for our sins, the rest is simply providing the listener an opportunity to respond to God’s call. 

It really is that simple.

Why, then, do we not share the gospel?

Brothers and Sisters in Christ, why then are not all of us sharing this life-saving, eternity-altering message with the lost among us? Is it fear? Is it lack of time? Is it lack of concern? Is it lack of knowledge of the gospel message?

Matt Queen, a Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary professor has said, “If you know enough of the gospel to be saved; then you know enough of the gospel to share it.” Every Christian came to exercise a saving faith in Jesus Christ because the gospel message was shared with them clearly and an opportunity to make a decision to follow Jesus as Savior and Lord was given to them. In fact, I have serious questions about the sincerity of one’s faith in Christ Jesus if they never share their faith with the lost around them.

In my experience, to deny one something they need so desperately is cruelty, not kindness. Why, then, would we take comfort denying others an opportunity to hear the life-saving message of the gospel?

I plead with local churches to offer evangelism training in and for their churches. Pastors, model evangelism to their congregants by sharing stories of your evangelism encounters from the pulpit regularly. God forbid that the reason our churches aren’t sharing the gospel outside the walls of the church is because our pastors aren’t sharing the gospel outside of the pulpit.

Not everyone has believed our message. Not everyone will. This is not reason for discouragement, however. Many have and many will. And presenting the gospel message to others is an enrichment exercise for a Christian. As the message is presented, God engraves the gospel upon a Christian’s heart every time they share.

Remember 3-1-6

In my last post, I promised to offer an evangelism tool that I’ve found helpful in keeping me pursuing the lost. It’s called 3-1-6. Here’s how it works.

Ask the Father to impress 3 people on your heart who you believe need the gift of salvation. Write their names down. Pray for them 1 time a day for 6 days, asking the Lord to give you an opportunity to share the gospel message of Jesus Christ with them in that week. I have found that when I pray earnestly and ask God to honor this prayer, I have been empowered with God’s love and affection for those precious souls and many more times than not, been given that opportunity.

And when you pray that prayer and the Lord grants you the honor of sharing the hope of Christ with them, don’t hesitate. Remember those words that shocked me into action that day: “Spit it out; share something!”

Jesus Follower. Husband. Father. Evangelist. PhD Evangelism @SWBTS. Woodturner. Cyclist. Cast-Iron Culinarian.

Have We Grown Past That Old Time Religion?

For God loved the world in this way: He gave his one and only Son, so that everyone who believes in him will not perish but have eternal life.

For many of us, John 3:16 was the first Bible verse that we memorized. Yet sadly, so many Christians feel they have outgrown this verse. They believe themselves to have moved past its meaning and that childlike faith they had growing up in church services, Vacation Bible School, and youth camps.

By the time we reach young adulthood and begin to enter the workforce, those precious childhood memories of our best Sunday dress and gospel moments seem like ages ago. As a sophisticated adult, the very idea of a loving and caring God so important to our younger days can be viewed as quaint, but as meaningful? For many, it was perhaps the faith of their grandparents and their generation, but not our own. It’s too rigid. Too archaic. As a result, many opt to hold the faith they once held dear at an arm’s length until they’re ready to live a life more in line with the “old-fashioned ways” of the Bible or until the crisis strikes and they run out of any other option. Then, when everything settles down, that’s when they’ll return to that Old Time Religion.

But that’s not the faith of our grandparents at all. The faith they exhibited was lived out day-to-day for decades before we ever took notice. They walked with Jesus every day long before we came along. So, when our grandmother sang us hymns at bedtime, it wasn’t a new song she had just learned in choir practice—it was the same song she had sung to your mother when rocking her to sleep. It was the same song she had sung as a little girl herself. That song—that reminder of the nearness of her Savior—kept her close to him through every storm of life. That’s not a faith grounded in attending church on the occasional weekend. A faith like that takes time.

A faith like that makes it easy to share with others. A faith like that spills out. Could that be why we find it so difficult to share our faith with others? Could it be that we lack that hard-earned confidence in God-our-Savior and that is why we find the words so difficult to speak?

The gospel hasn’t changed. It still saves. Romans 10:13 says, “For everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved,” and that promise still stands today. Christ is still saving those who trust in him by grace through faith—those who hear of Christ’s sacrifice and believe with a sincere heart. Christ hasn’t changed. He still offers the hope and fulfillment we seek.

In my next post, I want to offer an evangelism tool that I’ve found helpful in keeping me pursuing the lost. But for now, maybe it’s worth asking if our hesitation in sharing the gospel is the result of our distance from it. Perhaps we need to read those simple words from John’s Gospel once more.

For God loved the world in this way: He gave his one and only Son, so that everyone who believes in him will not perish but have eternal life.

Because if we believe those words to be true, it’s not the sort of thing that belong on a cross-stitched pillow carelessly tossed to the other end of the sofa. If we believe in him, it changes everything . . . and that can’t be put off.

Jesus Follower. Husband. Father. Evangelist. PhD Evangelism @SWBTS. Woodturner. Cyclist. Cast-Iron Culinarian.

Minding the College Gap: It’s about Priorities

In my previous post, I sought to explain that wise parents don’t assume that their son or daughter will participate in a local church during their collegiate years by default. Rather, as demonstrated by the example of George Scarborough and Benajah Carroll, instilling the importance of local church participation begins before a child heads off for college and requires that parents play a role in helping their children find a biblically-sound college church home.

My Story

I began college with all of the excitement of so many freshmen in the Fall of 1997 at a private Baptist college. I recall moving into my first dorm room, carrying my new bedding and dorm refrigerator up the stairs, meeting new people with each step. My roommate was an athlete that first semester, and his schedule was dramatically different that my own. We rarely saw one other, which didn’t bother me. I was on a mission. I was going to do what I wanted to do, study what I wanted to study, live how I wanted to live, and become who I wanted to be.

I had been reared in a small town and this was my first taste of freedom. There were no parents to rule over me. Looking back, my experience at that school was a mixed bag; I had both good and bad times. But I was on a mission of self. I wasn’t a Christian and most of those around me didn’t look or act like Christians. Being a private Baptist college, we were required to attend Bible classes, but the theology was loose and liberal; our New Testament Survey professor gave us more cause for doubt than faith. Eventually, I dropped out. I had only managed to make a mess of my life in my mission of self.

One year and two moves later, I gave college another shot, this time at a small liberal arts college. It was drastically different from the private Baptist university I had attended before. The president was a well-known and vocal atheist and anything the mindset both on and off of campus was “anything goes.” Each spring trimester, the cool fraternity would throw the “Bros and Hoes” party; it was like scenes from the old National Lampoon’s Animal House. And my life reflected this worldly mindset. It was from this environment that the LORD saved me. You see I had been on the mission of self, but that path was lonely, and headed for self-destruction. I too was worldly.

My Turning Point

At this second university, I met, carefully-watched, and listened to a group of college students who were Christians. Each of them prayed, witnessed, and loved me despite my sin, and they lived out a genuine faith in Christ that I had never seen before. The Gospel was on display and lived out before my eyes. They were like Christian Soldiers straight out of the sixth chapter of Ephesians. Their mission was different from mine. They had been called by Jesus Christ. They had been armed with a strong faith in God the Father, abided in the Son, and were empowered by the Holy Spirit! They heeded the words of the Apostle Paul who wrote to his young son in the faith,

Don’t let anyone despise your youth, but set an example for the believers in speech, in conduct, in love, in faith, and in purity (1 Timothy 4:12 CSB).

I owe a great debt of gratitude to the LORD God for his having surrounded me with this collegiate mission force. Their influence changed my life for Christ and they rejoiced greatly when I surrendered my life to him and joined God’s mission. I remain on that same mission even today.

None of them could have had any idea that one day I would one day marry and be called into the Gospel ministry as an evangelist. Nor could they have known that I would (Lord willing) one day complete a PhD in evangelism, while regularly sharing Christ with others and introducing precious souls to Jesus. They were participants in God’s plan to redeem my life from the pit of destruction and lead me into the bliss of forgiveness, mercy, and the grace of Jesus Christ.

It Comes Down to Priorities

Looking back, here’s the lesson learned: God had brought this group of individuals together for his eternal purposes even during their college years. Their first priority was serving God; education, for them, was only of secondary importance. They weren’t perfect, but they were obedient to Christ and deeply in love with him; they were involved in various local churches and the Baptist Student Ministries (BSM). They chose to live for God’s glory. They had a heart for the lost around them because they had been discipled and taught how to share their faith without fear. They were fearless soldiers of the cross.

Perhaps as a parent, you’ve heard others lament the spiritual conditions of our colleges and universities or you’ve taken your family to watch God’s Not Dead in theaters and you’ve wondered, “What can I do?” And God has answered that question in the person of your own college-aged student.

God can create in him or her the mind and heart of a soul-winner. He or she is the mission force of God on the campuses around the world. Revival can still break loose on campuses world-wide. Train up your children now to be personal evangelists. Teach them by example. Take them door-to-door evangelizing in your neighborhood and model what sharing your faith looks like. Go on international mission trips together and work in the harvest. Disciple your student and instill in their hearts a love for the lost, the Scripture, and the things that Jesus loves and then encourage them to live it out before their college classmates. Kingdom first; education second. No greater impact could be made on college campuses for Jesus Christ than the one your college student and their friends could make. Raise up a generation that will mind the college gap.

Jesus Follower. Husband. Father. Evangelist. PhD Evangelism @SWBTS. Woodturner. Cyclist. Cast-Iron Culinarian.

Minding the College Gap

All over the nation, students are heading to college. As difficult as this time can be for some parents, it is an important time for pastors as well. Just recently, I observed on Twitter a well-known pastor in one town placing a college-aged new believer under the care of another pastor in this new believer’s college town. I know both pastors and agree that the college-town pastor is the right man to shepherd this new believer. Their interchange demonstrated the beauty of cooperation and trust between Almighty God and these two Baptist pastors. Indeed, the entire interaction reminded me of another example of pastoral trust.

In a great biography titled Lee Rutland Scarborough: A Life of Service, the author, colleague, and friend of the subject, H. E. Dana records a similar transaction as a young seventeen-year-old Lee Scarborough travels by train from the West Texas frontiers to Baylor University in Waco, TX in January of 1888. George Scarborough, a Texas frontier preacher and Lee’s father, arranged for the young Scarborough to sit under the preaching and teaching of B. H. Carroll, who was the Senior Pastor of First Baptist Church. The shared trust between both pastors shaped the life of young Scarborough who matured in the faith and would eventually surrender his life to the service of gospel ministry.

Two valuable principles in this example merit noting.

Parents, your parental responsibility does not end when they go to college

Local church attendance in college requires parental guidance and accountability. These days, an enormous gap exists for most first-time college students who leave home unprepared to find a local church home. According to 2016 research done by Barna Group, as much as 59% of young people from churchgoing homes walk away from the faith. Such a statistic proves that more than half of our young people are unequipped and unguided to think, identify, locate, and commit themselves to Christ and his Church during college. Continued collegiate discipleship begins long before your student leaves home for university. George Scarborough regarded Carroll to have been the finest preacher in Texas. He spoke often about Carroll’s preaching and the happenings in the First Baptist Church of Waco to his son, Lee. Young Scarborough left for college with an understanding that he was to include local church membership and regular attendance as a vital part of his educational experience. Scarborough’s parents taught him to value Christ Jesus and the importance of local church membership. All of this guidance began in the home.

Pastor, your pastoral responsibility does not end when they go to college

B. H. Carroll had a well-known reputation for faithfully preaching the Word of God. He was faithful to Southern Baptist polity and doctrines. Not only had George Scarborough kept informed with Southern Baptist life and its preachers, but he assisted Lee in making an informed crucial decision about college church membership and attendance. The First Baptist Church of Waco welcomed college members.  George Scarborough wrote a letter of introduction to Carroll personally on his son’s behalf. Scarborough entrusted Carroll with young Scarborough’s spiritual formation during his years in the university.

The reality: rearing godly college students begins years before these students ever step foot on college campuses. Children glean most of their values and many habits from watching and listening to their parents. Parents, pray for your students to walk-in their faith while in college, but before those days, give them instruction and make provisions for them to make spiritually-healthy decisions about local church membership and attendance. In short teach them to follow Jesus, even without your direct oversight.

College towns are usually filled with local churches and faithful pastors. Indeed, they have been given the task of shepherding tomorrow’s leaders. Pastor, when you step up to the sacred desk next Sunday, look out and make eye contact with your college students, you may very well be looking into the eyes of the next Lee Rutland Scarborough or Billy Graham.

Over the course of the next few articles, I am going to discuss the issue of discipleship and provide some ideas to both parents and local churches in the hopes of helping to close this discipleship gap found in too many local churches. We have a responsibility to the next generation before God to disciple them well.

Jesus Follower. Husband. Father. Evangelist. PhD Evangelism @SWBTS. Woodturner. Cyclist. Cast-Iron Culinarian.

What’s In Your Witness?

For years, masterfully orchestrated Capital One credit card commercials have produced 30-second persuasive sound bites—from creatively using cheeky Vikings raiding modern scenarios to Samuel L. Jackson’s sleek, suited appeal asking the viewing audience, “What’s in your wallet?” Each commercial connects the audience’s emotional ties to greater financial success with the rewards and/or interest rates of this or that card and in mere moments, these commercials convince many people that a void in there financial portfolio exists that can only be filled by the adding of a Capital One credit card to their wallet.

Admittedly, the gift of salvation is free to all who believe on the name of Jesus Christ—the Son of God. A Christian witness is not akin to door-to-door salesmen, but similar to television commercials, it is critical to present a clear and direct Gospel presentation during each witness opportunity. The messenger carrying such an important word to a lost person need not beat around the bush, but should state their business and jump into the Good News as soon as possible. The gospel doesn’t need gimmicks or smoke and mirrors, but an honest effort on the part of the witness of Christ.

In this post, I want to draw what I believe to be important observations about evangelism from the account of Philip’s encounter with the Ethiopian official in Acts 8.

Sharing the gospel of Jesus Christ is not as complicated as some may assume. Few Christians in the “Bible Belt” share their faith—if ever, but even then, they usually lack confidence in the message of the gospel that comes from seeing God at work and spending time consistently in the Bible. Acts 8:25 states, “So, when they had solemnly testified and spoken the word of the Lord, they started back to Jerusalem, and were preaching the gospel to many villages of the Samaritans.” In this verse, we read that Phillip, Peter, and John are continual witnesses for Jesus Christ. Their experience having been affected by the gospel led them to testify to the grace they had experienced. They testified to what they had seen, heard, and done in Jesus’s name.

1. Make your appeal personal

A personal testimony with Scriptures woven throughout can be an effective witnessing tool. Every born-again believer in Jesus Christ has a unique story. A personal appeal to a lost person by simply sharing how you came to saving faith in Jesus Christ may steer conversations into a full gospel presentation and invitation to trust Christ.

2. Allow the Lord to interrupt your plans

Witnessing encounters often come as a complete surprise to the believer. God sometimes interrupts good works being done in the name of Jesus in order to turn our attention to a greater need. Phillip and his companions were busy in the region of the Samaritans sharing the message of the gospel, but the Lord chose to send a witness to one in need of hearing the message of God’s grace. “But an angel of the Lord spoke to Phillip saying, ‘Get up and go south to the road that descends from Jerusalem to Gaza.’ (This is a desert road.)” God often interrupts and prompts believers to share the gospel with someone merely crossing their path. Phillip was sensitive to the Lord’s leading in his life and and willing to be obedient to the Lord. The Bible says nothing about a moment’s hesitation, but rather indicated that he got up and went to the place where God had directed him. Just as Phillip was prepared to allow the Lord to redirect his steps, so we too must be prepared.

3. Be willing to be obedient

Witnessing is to be the main task of the whole church in the whole world. . . . We can never expect the world to come to us. We must go to it. -Roy Fish

Jesus expects his followers to be obedient and to carry the gospel message to the ends of the earth. He empowers his witnesses for this task with the Holy Spirit. Phillip had been filled with the Holy Spirit and was sensitive to his leadership in evangelism. Jesus is a personal savior and each individual receives his gospel message personally. 

Phillip met the Ethiopian eunuch on the road and was instructed by the Spirit to “Go up and join this chariot.” Often during community outreach programs by local churches, witnessing teams will encounter many negative responses at homes and find themselves discouraged and ready to give up for the day, only for the Holy Spirit to prompt them to visit one more home or person. And many who proved themselves willing to heed that prompting receive an opportunity to present the gospel message and invite that person to trust Christ as their Lord and Savior!

4. Draw the gospel message from the Word of God

Engaging the lost is frightening for many because of all of the questions they expect to receive. Generally, the lost have some familiarity with misunderstood, or worse, blatantly false messages concerning the teachings of Christianity including the Triune Godhead and the way of salvation. In addition to their personal testimony, Christians need to be able to explain the Bible to the lost. Such knowledge of the Scripture comes only from consistent study in God’s Word. During a witnessing opportunity, the witness must stay rooted in the Words of Life (1 John 1:1). I have found it to be beneficial to allow the lost person to read the Scriptures aloud for himself, thereby allowing the Holy Spirit to affect his heart with the power of the gospel. Many evangelists have used different gospel presentations, including, Steps to Peace with God, by Billy Graham or The Four Spiritual Laws. While these presentations are many times very effective, they can never overshadow the value of reading and explaining the Bible. Instead, they should be used in addition to it.

Witnessing is not difficult; nor is it the responsibility for a select few within the church. Everyone called by the name of Christ is responsible to proclaim the name of Christ. As Charles Spurgeon wrote so long ago, “Every Christian . . . is either a missionary or an impostor. Recollect that you are either trying to spread abroad the kingdom of Christ, or else you do not love him at all. It cannot be that there is a high appreciation of Jesus, and a totally silent tongue about him.”

Reader, what’s in your witness?

Jesus Follower. Husband. Father. Evangelist. PhD Evangelism @SWBTS. Woodturner. Cyclist. Cast-Iron Culinarian.